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 •  October 9

WHEN the names of potential candidates for the new head of America’s regulatory agency for drugs, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), were first circulated, you could almost hear the sound of jaws hitting desks throughout the pharmaceuticals industry. One contender was Jim O’Neill, head of Mithril Capital Management, an investment firm, who is...

www.economist.com

 •  April 1

WHEN the names of potential candidates for the new head of America’s regulatory agency for drugs, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), were first circulated, you could almost hear the sound of jaws hitting desks throughout the pharmaceuticals industry. One contender was Jim O’Neill, head of Mithril Capital Management, an investment firm, who is...

www.economist.com

 •  February 14

LOUIS MACHOGU, the owner of a pharmacy near Nairobi, has noticed a change. In the past decade Kenya, like much of Africa, has seen a surge in foreign aid to fight infectious diseases. Thanks to antiretroviral treatments, HIV is no longer a death sentence. But the decline of one scourge means that people are living long enough to fall sick in other...

www.economist.com

 •  February 14

THE Chinese media frequently portray doctors not as life-saving heroes but as profit-seeking villains. Popular anger against medical staff sometimes spills over. One gruesome period in October last year saw at least six violent attacks by disgruntled patients on medical workers, including one that led to the death of a doctor. In 2012 there had...

www.economist.com

 •  February 14

IN 1742 Benjamin Franklin invented a new type of stove, for which he was offered a patent. Franklin refused it, arguing in his autobiography that because “we enjoy[ed] great advantages from the inventions of others, we should be glad of an opportunity to serve others by any invention of ours.” Most inventors are not as generous as the “Newton of...

www.economist.com

 •  February 14

FEW industries have been shaped more by mergers and takeovers than pharmaceuticals. This is because developing drugs is such a high-risk business. Most potential medicines either fail to reach the market, or fail thereafter to recoup the cost of developing them. If a company does not have enough promising drugs in its research pipeline, its most...