www.voanews.com

www.voanews.com
Share

www.voanews.com

 •  August 3

MUMBAI — India, one of the world's largest markets for pharmaceuticals, is drawing up its first set of marketing rules for drugmakers, restricting gifts and trips offered to doctors and pharmacists to 1,000 rupees ($15), according to a draft proposal seen by Reuters. Such rules are common overseas, but are not set in stone in India, where...

www.voanews.com

 •  July 9

GOA, INDIA — In 28 years in India’s pharmaceuticals sector, Rajiv Desai has never been busier. Most of the last six months on his desk calendar is marked green, indicating visits to the 12 plants of Lupin, India’s No. 2 drugmaker, where Desai is a senior quality control executive. Only one day is red — a day off. That’s what is needed these days to...

www.voanews.com

 •  March 18

EVERETT, WASHINGTON — As deaths from painkillers and heroin abuse spiked and street crimes increased, the mayor of Everett took major steps to tackle the opioid epidemic devastating this working-class city north of Seattle. Mayor Ray Stephanson stepped up patrols, hired social workers to ride with officers and pushed for more permanent housing for...

www.voanews.com

 •  February 14

GENEVA — The World Health Organization reported that a couple of promising vaccines against Ebola, which is ravaging parts of West Africa, may be ready for use by early next year. Work on other potentially life-saving experimental therapies is also underway, the organization said on Friday. The WHO considers the Ebola outbreak the most severe...

www.voanews.com

 •  February 14

Of the 850 new drugs and vaccines approved for all diseases over the past decade, only 37 were for so-called neglected diseases: malaria, TB, chagas, sleeping sickness and other diseases of poverty. A new study published in The Lancet Global Health highlights what its authors call a 'fatal imbalance' in research and development of treatments for...

www.voanews.com

 •  February 14

A new low-cost, rapid blood test for sickle cell anemia could someday save the lives of thousands children in developing countries. An estimated 300,000 children are born with the genetic blood disorder each year in Africa alone. It causes affected red cells to form into a sickle shape, clogging blood vessels. Researchers say more than 50 percent...

www.voanews.com

 •  February 14

In the 1920s, the discovery of penicillin revolutionized the treatment of lethal infections. Today the challenge is how to battle bacteria that have become resistant to the drugs we use to fight them. Now, some University of Pittsburgh researchers have designed a synthetic compound that might hold promise in the fight against so-called...