phys.org

phys.org
Share

phys.org

 •  January 25

The rise of antibiotic resistance among common infectious bacteria is a worrisome health threat that has many scientists looking for a solution. Jennifer Hines, Ph.D., professor of chemistry and biochemistry at Ohio University, is one of the few looking to ribonucleic acid (RNA) structures for new drug discovery. Her research group is studying a...

phys.org

 •  November 21, 2017

State-of-the-art microfluidics technology developed by Dr Shery Huang, Lecturer in Bioengineering, and her team, will be merged with world-class expertise in induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology and kidney disease from the University of Bristol, the Mario Negri Institute and Evotec. The goal is to develop a functional and novel drug...

phys.org

 •  October 31, 2017

A new mapping by the University of Copenhagen and Uppsala University of all these drugs on the market and currently tested in clinical trials has been published in the prestigious journal Nature Reviews Drug Discovery. The mapping reveals trends for how this type of drug targets a larger number or receptors, takes advantage of new scientific...

phys.org

 •  September 25, 2017

Researchers at Dartmouth College have developed a technique to produce synthetic steroids that could pave the way for a cascade of new drug discoveries. The process, published in the journal Nature Chemistry, facilitates access to rare, mirror-image isomers of naturally occurring steroid structures. The technique, based on a series of new chemical...

phys.org

 •  July 31, 2017

The field of medicine has come a long way from using heroine as a cough remedy or magnet therapy to improve blood flow. These outdated methods were put to bed decades ago. But there are plenty of ancient medicinal practices that have stood the test of time. In fact, many of the life-saving pharmaceuticals we rely on today are derived from plants...

phys.org

 •  July 7, 2017

The ability to consistently create desirable molecules and avoid undesirable ones could greatly accelerate pharmaceutical production. Many molecules come in two mirror-image configurations, often labeled left-handed and right-handed. Usually, only one of the two is biologically desired, but the issue is more complicated than that, said Dr. Uttam...

phys.org

 •  June 29, 2017

Sydney researcher Lidia Matesic has developed a technique to speed up the development of nuclear medicines allowing hospitals to not only make nuclear medicine in-house, but also tailor-made to the patient. In remote hospitals, this would also allow a larger variety of these pharmaceuticals to be used. "We have some nuclear medicines that work...

phys.org

 •  June 22, 2017

Over the past five years, an iterative stochastic elimination (ISE) algorithm developed in the laboratory of Prof. Amiram Goldblum, at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem's Institute for Drug Research, has been applied to the discovery of potential drugs. The Institute is part of the School of Pharmacy in the Faculty Of Medicine. First tested to...

phys.org

 •  June 2, 2017

HarkerBIO is a "shining star" in the growing biotech ecosystem taking shape on the Buffalo Niagara Medical Campus. The small structural biology company determines 3-D structures of proteins for drug and biotech companies. That may sound straightforward – even simple – but the process is something right out of Star Trek. HarkerBIO uses sophisticated...

phys.org

 •  April 10, 2017

This approach could help researchers in pharmaceutical companies to generate hypotheses for drug discovery. For instance, strongly correlated disease-side-effect pairs identified by the patented invention could be beneficial for drug discovery in many ways. One could use the side-effect information to repurpose existing treatments (e.g. drugs...