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 •  January 18

Morning sickness can put a real strain on pregnant mothers. And when diet or non-medicinal treatments fail, a drug that contains doxylamine and pyridoxine is often prescribed. However, the drug's effectiveness has been called into question. In 2017, researchers working at the University of Toronto in Canada and the Keenan Research Centre of the Li...

www.medicalnewstoday.com

 •  October 13, 2017

In a recent phase II clinical trial, an over-the-counter allergy drug was shown to improve nervous system function in patients with multiple sclerosis. Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disease affecting more than 2.3 million people around the world. The condition attacks myelin, or the waxy coat around nerves, and compromises the nerves'...

www.medicalnewstoday.com

 •  February 28, 2017

The World Health Organization (WHO) developed the "priority pathogen list" after a request from UN member states. To date, decisions about which pathogens to prioritize for research and development (R&D) have been made by individual drug companies, large and small. These decisions tend to be variously influenced by perceived or unmet medical needs,...

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 •  February 14, 2017

The latest innovation in medical 3D printing is a 3D printer that could one day make customized medicines on demand, currently under development by the University of Central Lancashire in Preston in the UK. The University of Central Lancashire (UCLan) team says that the machine - which is awaiting a patent application - can "print" a tablet with a...

www.medicalnewstoday.com

 •  February 14, 2017

At present, to screen for compounds that might show promise in tackling disease, researchers have to rely on animal models like specially-bred lab mice. However, many candidate drugs that pass such tests are later rejected, and some that do not pass could be effective in humans. This leads to delays, increased costs and lost opportunities to the...

www.medicalnewstoday.com

 •  February 14, 2017

Surgery for cardiovascular problems often requires the implantation of vascular grafts and stents to prop open failing or narrowed blood vessels. However, while this solves the immediate problem of restoring blood flow, it introduces the risk of blood clots. Now, in a new study published in the Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, chemists from ITMO...

www.medicalnewstoday.com

 •  February 14, 2017

New research suggests it may be possible to slow the progression of Parkinson's disease using a man-made peptide that stops the formation of faulty protein fibrils that kill the brain cells that produce dopamine. Estimates suggest up to 10 million people worldwide are living with Parkinson's disease - a progressive neurological disorder caused by...

www.medicalnewstoday.com

 •  February 14, 2017

A synthetic molecule that imitates an important section of the Ebola virus promises to speed up discovery of anti-Ebola agents capable of dealing with all current strains and any that emerge in future epidemics. The molecule - known as a peptide mimic - represents a critical region of the Ebola virus that does not change as it mutates. This means...

www.medicalnewstoday.com

 •  February 14, 2017

Scientists have announced what they say is a "major breakthrough" in the fight against antibiotic resistance, after a new compound combined with an existing antibiotic has proven successful in phase II trials. Antibiotic resistance is defined as an infection that does not respond to a particular drug, as a result of bacteria changes that make the...

www.medicalnewstoday.com

 •  February 14, 2017

A simple blood test could be on the way to replacing the biopsy as the gold standard for detecting cancer, saving lives and money, according to researchers in the UK. Findings on the revolutionary new treatment were presented this week at the annual World Conference on Lung Cancer in Colorado by Eric Lim, consultant thoracic surgeon at Royal...