Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology News

Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology News
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Scientists at the University of Warwick, U.K., have developed biomarker-based blood and urine tests for autism spectrum disorders (ASD), which they suggest could enable much earlier diagnosis in children, and so speed the start of treatment. The approach, developed by a team headed by Naila Rabbani, Ph.D., reader of experimental systems biology at...

AbbVie will partner with Voyager Therapeutics to develop and commercialize gene therapies for Alzheimer's disease and other neurodegenerative diseases, through a collaboration that could generate more than $1.1 billion-plus for Voyager, the companies said today. The collaboration is intended to create one-time treatments by combining AbbVie's...

A drug that is commonly used to treat high blood pressure in children and adults could potentially help to prevent the onset of type 1 diabetes (T1D) in up to 60% of at-risk patients, according to U.S. researchers. A team led by Aaron Michels, M.D., at the University of Colorado Anschutz (CU Anschutz) Medical Campus, and colleagues at the...

Researchers have understood for decades the importance that DNA repair mechanisms play in maintaining genomic integrity and keeping carcinogenesis in check. For instance, the BRACA1/2 genes and protein products have been found to play a critical role in the development and outcome of breast and ovarian cancers. So important are these two genes...

For the first time, a real pathogen has instigated a real disease process in an artificial organ, and scientists are really, really pleased. As far as scientists are concerned, the whole point of an artificial organ—in this case, a liver-on-a-chip platform—is to simulate a real organ’s physiology, and that includes pathophysiology. By using an...

Scientists headed by team at the Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have identified a new approach to cancer therapy that involves blocking a single enzyme that plays a key role in how tumors respond to oxidative stress. Elias Arnér, Ph.D., and colleagues identified highly specific inhibitors of the selenium-containing TXN reductase 1 (TXNRD1) that...

We all know that slogging to the gym on a regular basis has positive effects on our future well-being. While this sentiment should seemingly be a motivating factor to keep oneself in shape, it tends to do little in the way of inspiring us to get out of bed early on those chilly winter mornings. Well, perhaps some new data from investigators at UT...

With a large swath of the population entering its senior years, the number of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) cases are expected to skyrocket, placing a tremendous burden on the healthcare system. Yet, a glimmer of hope may have just emerged as investigators from the Cleveland Clinic Lerner Research Institute (CCLRI) report that gradually depleting an...

Click Image To Enlarge + The growth of human colon cancer cells (raised in culture) is unaffected by the MELK gene. Top row: untreated cells; bottom row: cells treated with a MELK inhibitor drug. Left two columns, control cells; right two columns, cells in which MELK gene has been knocked out. CSHL researchers conclude that MELK is not involved in...

The FDA has approved a new test for the human papillomavirus (HPV). The new test, which is called the Onclarity™ HPV assay, can detect the genotypes likely to cause cervical cancer in women. Developed by BD Diagnostic Systems, the new test can identify 14 HPV genotypes, including HPV types 16, 18, and 45—which are associated with the majority of...